EXPLORE

Cornell University

Ithaca, New York

The Cornell Engineering World Health chapter was founded in the fall of 2012 by a group of undergraduates who wanted to make a meaningful impact in the world, even as students. This mission has become the core foundation of EWH as a project team that seeks to make innovative and low-cost medical devices for developing countries and low-resource communities. From idea conception, to design, to final prototyping, Cornell EWH has created several devices with the potential for impact. While in the past the team has submitted prototype designs to an international competition, and placed 3rd in their first submission, the team is now working on building devices that will be directly implemented by health care workers in low-resource communities.

Water Well Project

Pallapatla, India

"This year, Cornell EWH is collaborating with Forefront, a non-profit organization that aims to provide sustainable change to underdeveloped communities with a four-phase approach. In the second phase of the plan aimed at creating clean drinking water, Forefront and Cornell EWH have partnered to create a remote water quality monitoring device for a well recently implemented in the village of Pallapatla, India. Our chapter of EWH is responsible for creating a working prototype and aims to install the system by the summer of 2016, working in a full team, cross-sub-team effort to develop the structure, integrated electronics, and data visualization for the remote monitoring device to provide both Forefront and the villagers of Pallapatla a reliable stream of information about the drinking water."

Trip to Peru

Lima, Peru

"Members of our team travelled to Lima, Peru for eight days, where they partnered with MedLife International, a nonprofit organization that runs many mobile clinics. During the trip, our team shadowed health care workers and worked alongside them to serve local patients and completed several projects, including building a staircase to help facilitate transportation for the community. Members not only grew as individuals through their first-hand exposure to the implementation of global health initiatives but also helped bring back ideas and stories to guide the future progression of the team. As our team continues to grow, we hope we can continuously build upon these valuable first hand experiences by creating more opportunities to interact with the world."

CORNELL EWH

PROJECTS

Vaccine Refrigerator

"Each year, vaccine-preventable diseases claim the lives of over 1 million children across the world. For remote African villages with limited accessibility, it is not only difficult to store vaccines on-site due to a lack of electricity, but it is also difficult to have vaccines delivered before they spoil due to warm temperatures... Recognizing the need for keeping vaccine cold, Cornell EWH decided to construct a passively cooled vaccine fridge that could maintain the necessary cold temperature for several hours. The new extended time allows NGO workers the ability to transport the vaccines further during a campaign without the fear of spoilage."

Vital Signs Monitor

"The World Health Organization estimates that 70% to 96% of medical equipment in these countries is broken, however, many medical facilities do not have the financial capabilities to replace important parts for these existing devices. One such device commonly utilized is a vital signs monitor (VSM)... With a design in mind, the team began to construct their own version of the VSM. Using a minimalistic design, the VSM collects vitals using a temperature sensor and two pulse sensors which record data at two locations on the body to ensure accuracy (eg. a finger and toe). Patient information is entered via a system that toggles through successive displays: age, gender, weight, diagnostic location and a final screen displaying collected data. This information is able to be read via the device itself or over the network to which the monitor belongs."

Trip to Peru

Aside from creating prototypes, Cornell Engineering World Health actively participates in outreach activities in order to integrate with local communities and find inspiration for future projects. Most recently, members of our team travelled to Lima, Peru for eight days, where they partnered with MedLife International, a nonprofit organization that runs many mobile clinics. During the trip, our team shadowed health care workers and worked alongside them to serve local patients and completed several projects, including building a staircase to help facilitate transportation for the community. Through this eye-opening experience, our members not only grew as individuals through their first-hand exposure to the implementation of global health initiatives but also helped bring back ideas and stories that guide the future progression of the team. As our team continues to grow, we hope we can continuously build upon these valuable first hand experiences by creating more opportunities to interact with the world.